My startup’s dead! 5 things I learned

Last week I sent the dreaded, “I’m going out of business” email to clients of my BitShuva Radio startup:

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An unintentional startup

A few years ago, I wrote a piece of software to solve a niche problem: the Messianic Jewish religious community had a lot of great music, but no online services were playing that music. I wrote a Pandora-like music service that played Messianic Jewish music, Chavah Messianic Radio was born, and it’s been great. (Chavah is still doing very well to this day; Google Analytics tells me it’s had 5,874 unique listeners this month – not bad at all!)

After creating Chavah, I wrote a programming article about the software: How to Build a Pandora Clone in Silverlight 4. (At the time, Silverlight was the hotness! I’ve since ported Chavah to HTML5, but I digress.)

Once that article was published, several people emailed me asking if I’d build a radio station for them. One after another. Turns out there many underserved music niches. Nigerian music. West African soul. Egyptian Coptic chants. Indie artists. Instrumentals. Ethiopian pop. A marketplace for beats. Local bands from central Illinois. All these clients came out of the woodwork, asking me to build clones of my radio station for their communities.

After these clients approached me – with no marketing or sales pitches on my part – it looked like a good business opportunity. I founded BitShuva Radio and got to work for these clients. I had founded a startup.

But after almost 2 years, making less than $100/month on recurring monthly fees, and spending hours every week working for peanuts, I’ve decided to fold the startup. It wasn’t worth my time, it was eating into my family life, preventing me from working on things I really wanted to work on. So this week, I cut the cord.

Along the way, I learned so much! Maybe this will help the next person who does their first startup.

Here’s what I learned:

1. Don’t be afraid to ask for a *lot* of money.

When I acquired my first client, I had no idea how much to charge. For me, the work involved forking an existing codebase, swapping out some logos and colors, and deploying to a web server. A few hours of work.

I dared to ask for the hefty sum of $75.

Yes, I asked for SEVENTY-FIVE WHOLE DOLLARS! I remember saying that figure to the man on the other end of the phone – what a thrill! – $75 for forking a codebase, ha! To my surprise, he agreed to this exorbitant charge.

In my startup newbie mind, $75 seemed totally reasonable for forking a codebase and tweaking some CSS. After all, it’s not that much work.

What I didn’t understand was, you charge not for how much work it is for you. You charge how much the service is worth. A custom Pandora-like radio station, with thumb-up and –down functionality, song requests, user registration, playing native web audio with fallbacks to Flash for old browsers – creating a community around a niche genre of music – that’s what you charge for. That’s the value being created here. The client doesn’t care if it’s just forking a codebase and tweaking CSS – to him, it’s a brand new piece of software with his branding and content. He doesn’t know what code, repo forking, or CSS is. All he knows is he’s getting a custom piece of software doing exactly what he wants. And that’s worth a lot more than $75.

It took me several clients to figure this out. My next client, I tried charging $100. He went for it. The next client $250. The next client $500. Then $1000.

I kept charging more and more until finally 3 clients all turned down my $2000 fee. So I lowered the price back to $1000.

Money is just business. It’s not insulting to ask for a lot of money. Change as much as you can. Had I knew this when I started, I’d have several thousand dollars more in my pocket right now.

2. Keep your head above the ever-changing technology waters

Don’t drown!

When I built my first the first radio software, Silverlight seemed like a reasonable choice. HTML5 audio was nascent, Firefox didn’t support native MP3 audio, IE9 was still a thing. So I turned to plugins.

Over time, plugins like Silverlight fell out of favor, particularly due to the mobile explosion. Suddenly, everyone’s trying to run my radio software on phones and tablets, and plugins don’t work there, so I had to act.

I ported my radio software code to HTML5, with Flash fallbacks for old browsers. KnockoutJS was the the new hotness, so I moved all our Silverlight code to HTML5+CSS3+KnockoutJS.

As the software grew in complexity, it became apparent you really need something more than data-binding, but Knockout was just data-binding. Single Page Application (SPA) frameworks became the new hotness, and I ported our code over to DurandalJS.

Soon, Durandal was abandoned by its creator, and said creator joined the AngularJS team at Google. Not wanting to be left on a dying technology, I ported the code to Angular 1.x.

Shortly after, the Durandal author left the Angular team over issues with the Angular vNext design, and founded Aurelia.

If I was continuing my startup today, I’d be looking at riding that wave and moving to Aurelia or Angular 2.

What am I saying? Staying on top of the technology wave is a balancing act: stand still and you’ll be dead within a year, but move to every new hotness, and you’ll be forever porting your code and never adding new features. My advice is to be fiscally pragmatic about it: if your paying clients have a need for new technology, migrate. Otherwise, use caution and a wait-and-see approach.

Applying this wisdom in hindsight to my startup, it was wise to move from Silverlight to HTML5 (my paying clients needed that to run on mobile). However, jumping around from Knockout to Durandal to Angular did little for my clients. I should have used more caution and used a wait-and-see approach.

3. Custom software is a fool’s errand. Build customizable software, not custom software builds

My startup grew out of clients asking for custom versions of my radio software. “Oh, you have a Pandora clone? Can you make one for my music niche?”

Naturally, I spent most of my time building custom software. They pay me a nice up-front sum ($1000 in the latter days), and we go our merry way, right?

Turns out, it’s a terrible business model. Here’s why:

Clients continually want more features, bug fixes, more customization. I charged that $1000 up-front fee to build a custom station, but then would spend many hours every week responding to customer complaints, customer requests, bug fixes, performance fixes, new features. And I didn’t charge a dime for that. (After all, the client’s perspective was, “I already paid you!”)

In hindsight, I should have built a customizable platform, ala WordPress, in which potential radio clients could go to my website, bitshuva.com, spin up a new radio station (mystation.bitshuva.com), customize it in-browser, let them use the whole damn thing for free, and when they reach a limit of songs or bandwidth, bring up a PayPal prompt. All of that is automated, it doesn’t require my intervention, and it’s not “custom” software, it’s software that the client themselves can customize to their OCDified heart’s content.

Had I done that, my startup probably would be making more money today, maybe even sustainably so.

Bottom line: Unless a client is paying for 25% of your annual salary, don’t go follow the “I’ll build a custom version just for you, dear client” business model. It’s a fool’s errand.

4. On Saying “No”

I’m a people-pleaser. So, when a person pays me money, I amplify that people pleasing by 10.

“Hey, Judah, can you add XYZ to my radio station this week?”

“Judah! Buddy! Did you fix that one thing with the logins?”

“How’s it going, Judah! Where is that new feature we talked about?”

“Hey Judah, hope it’s going well. When are you going to finish my radio station features? I thought we were on for last week.”

I wanted to please my precious clients. So of course I said “yes”. I said yes, yes, yes, until I had no time left for myself, my sanity, my family.

A turning point for me for over late December, at my in-laws. I was upstairs working, rather than spending the holidays with my kids, my wife. “What the hell am I doing?” The amount of money I was making was small beans, why am I blowing my very limited time on this earth doing *this*?

You see why folks in the YCombinator / Silicon Valley startup clique put so much emphasis on, “You should be young, single, work exclusively on your startup, all-in committal.” I can totally see why, but I also completely don’t want that lifestyle.

Maybe if I had followed YCombinator-level devotion to my startup, it would have grown. But the reality is, I value things outside of software, too. :-) I like to chill and watch shows and eat ice cream. I like to relax on the couch with my wife. I like to teach my son how to drive. I like to play My Little Ponies with my daughter. I like to play music on the guitar. I like to work on tech pet projects (like Chavah, MessianicChords, EtzMitzvot).

The startup chipped away at all that, leaving me with precious little time outside of the startup.

5. Startups force you to learn outside your technological niche

On a more positive note, running a startup taught me all kinds of things I would have never learned as a plain old programmer.

When I launched my startup, I was mostly a Windows desktop app developer (i.e. dead in the water). I didn’t know how to run websites in IIS, how to work with DNS, how to scale things, didn’t understand web development. I didn’t know how to market software, how to talk to clients, what prices to charge, didn’t have an eye for “ooh, I could monetize that…”

Building a useful piece of software — a radio station used by a few thousand people — forces you to learn all this crap and become proficient and building useful things.

In the end, getting all retrospective and and hindsight-y here, I’m glad I took the plunge and did a startup, even if it didn’t work out financially, because I learned so much and am a more rounded technological individual for it. Armed with all this knowledge, I believe I will try my hand at a startup again in the future. For now, I’m going to enjoy my temporary freedom. :-)

Thanks for reading.

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“Yet Another JS Framework” isn’t so bad after all

Summary: The web is evolving. Fast. The default reaction is framework fatigue: “Another JS framework to learn? Ugh!” But there’s a hidden upside to the rapid evolution in front-end web dev, and it benefits your happiness, your mind, and your wallet.

We’re seeing rapid evolution in the web development space. Not only is JavaScript and HTML evolving for today’s needs, but numerous frameworks are popping up to leverage the new bits and help you build better web apps.

This fast-paced evolution can be difficult for web developers. There’s a never-ending stream of new things to learn, and that gets overwhelming.

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My experience In the last 2 years testifies to this: I’ve built web apps with plain old jQuery, then Knockout, then Durandal, then Angular. And with today’s announcement, I’ll probably write my next one with Aurelia. That’s 5 different libraries/frameworks in just 2 years! Web devleopment is a beautiful soup.

But this does lead to developer framework fatigue. On Hacker News today, for instance,

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Having to learn new stuff all the time and trying to keep up is fatiguing and can be overwhelming.

But there’s another side of this to consider. Rapid evolution leads to better ideas, keeps your mind fresh and your job more interesting. It gives developers an opportunity to stand out with new skills and make more money.

Better ideas rise to the top

Make no mistake: web development has improved by leaps and bounds in the last decade. Rapid library and framework evolution are to thank.

(If a crotchety developer pining away about “the good ol’ days” tells you otherwise, he’s not telling the truth. Those old days were not good. They were littered with browser incompatibilities, unmaintainable apps, no concern for architecture or testing. It was truly the wild west of coding, and it sucked.)

When I started web development, front-end JavaScript meant adding a single giant JavaScript file where you’d do your DOM manipulation and event handlers. The DOM manipulation was usually using browser-specific APIs, and the handlers were hooked up in the global namespace.

This was like the Visual Basic era: put everything into a single file, maybe even a single giant function! We didn’t care about maintainability, testing, separation of concerns.

It was a simpler time, yes, but it was also the time when web development and JavaScript received ugly reputations that persisted until only recently.

Back in the bad ol’ days, web apps themselves generally sucked, too, as a reflection of the code underneath. Great web apps like Gmail, DropBox, Evernote, Pandora…these didn’t exist because building web apps was hard. (Pandora existed…but as a plugin-based Flash app back then!)

Since then, things have vastly improved. How?

Instead of a spaghetti mess of $(“#someVal”).parent().adjacent(“<div>”+ someVar + “</div>”), we’re doing nice and clean logic on variables. Through the magic of data-binding, those variables will be displayed in the UI automatically. The code is modular: simple HTML pages data-bind to controllers containing logic. Controllers wire up to services to load data from the server. The code is arranged in modules with single responsibility, well-defined application architecture, easy to test, easy to modify and extend. This results in better web apps with fewer bugs.

Intellectually stimulating

I actually like the fact that I must keep learning.

It’s true; web development can be overwhelming with all the new technologies and JavaScript frameworks released almost monthly. (If you’re overwhelmed, remember: you don’t have to learn them all.)

But at the same time, I like learning. It keeps my mind fresh. It keeps my job interesting. I like building things, and learning new and better ways to build things is intellectually stimulating.

Consider the alternative. In a space with slow evolution, such as mainframes, there’d be practically no moving technology forward; we’d be doing the same thing for decades, over and over again. See something that sucks about your dev stack? Too bad, you can’t change it.

As a developer and entrepreneur, I want to be doing new things, interesting things, moving the software craft forward. It is a little ego-stoking to think that moving software forward actually moves technology and civilization forward, even if in a small way.

I don’t believe there’s a world in which my skills go stagnant and I still enjoy building technology. It would get old, I would grow tired of my work, become demotivated. My job would become only a means to pay the bills.

I don’t want that career. I like a career that remains fresh, regularly infused with new knowledge. That new knowledge can then be used outside of the professional realm to build your own projects of value to you, personally. (I’ve done this with Chavah, MessianicChords, and EtzMitzvot.)

“Look ma, I’m worth a lot of money”

Knowledge is power. The more I consume, the more powerful (and valuable) I become. Therefore, I am actually grateful to be in a career that requires knowledge growth.

My last 2 gigs as an independent consultant were aided by my knowledge of a single JavaScript framework. And my hack-at-night job gives me money because I know another JavaScript framework. And my startup exists because of the new knowledge I’ve learned in the last two years.

Rapid evolution demands me to acquire more knowledge to remain relevant. I’d be hard-pressed to find work if I was still building web apps like it was 1998, or worse, building desktop apps like it was 1995. (Goodbye, CListViewCtrl. No tears.)

Summary

By continually learning, not only am I intellectually stimulated, I grow in professional value. Corporations pay a lot of money to the niche few who keep their skills relevant. They stand in awe and fork over the dollars by the truckload for the magical wizards who pound on the keyboard and produce revenue-generating, business-critical apps.

So yeah, Yet Another JS Framework was announced today. And I’m OK with that.

Show and tell: Beds and services for homeless youth

Check it out! Awesome success story here: my last project, ysnmn.org, is live! It’s a place for homeless youth to find beds and services in Minnesota. Also, we made it to the front page of Hacker News!

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I’m a big fan of helping people, and I think this project really does that.

Imagine you’re a homeless 16 year old. You need food, you need a bed to sleep in. Somewhere to shower. Cheap clothing. Maybe you need medical care or counseling. Or help with parenting your child. Maybe you’re looking for a way to finish your education and get back on your feet and off the streets.

Enter ysnmn.org. You pull out your phone, go to the website. Instantly you can see shelters nearest you:

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What buses to take from your current location to get to a drop-in center:

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What food shelves are opened and what they serve:image

What phone numbers to call, where to get medical help:image

Where to find a warm bed for the night:
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Or maybe you just need to be notified when a bed for a female 16 year old becomes available:
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It was such a pleasure building this thing! Working with people who are actually doing good in the world through helping homeless youth is a big win. It’s so satisfying building something for goodness, rather than just for business. The most memorable moment on the project was testing the app with youth ambassadors; I remember one of the kids turning to me and saying, “I wish I had this when I was homeless.” Big smile right there on yours truly.

Technologically, I had a blast building the app as the lone developer! Smile This was a nice change from my previous gig. I had quit my consulting day job to take this project – working as independent consultant in the process – and being the lone developer, I was able to architect the app as I saw fit. We were required to use the Microsoft stack, seeing as how they funded development. But I was cool with that – C# is a great language, Azure is increasingly a solid platform, and TypeScript on the client was a pure joy. I would have preferred to use RavenDB over MS SQL, but aside from that, the freedom of architecture was quite liberating from previous projects working as a cog in a bigger corporate team.

It was my first stab at using AngularJS. I had built Knockout, Durandal, and classic MVC apps in the past, but this was my first stab with Angular. I liked it enough that I’ve adopted it for most of my side projects.

Many shout outs to Microsoft and their Azure group, and particularly Adam Grocholski who not only facilitated this, but also helped us secure some additional credits and put out a few fires during development, and his wife Ann Marie Grocholski who heads up one of the local youth shelters. You guys rock!

A big thank you to the Target Foundation, who helped fund this project with a generous grant.

A big shout out to DevJam in Minneapolis. They approached me to build this project, paid me a nice sum, provide great working environment, and are generally very cool people. I had a great time working with them. Special thanks to Matt Bjornson who worked with me and the shelters the whole time, came up with some great mockups for the UI, and saw this thing to completion. Special thanks to Susan Greve for recruiting me onto this project. So glad I took it!

A shout out to Twilio, particularly Kevin Whinnery, who helped us get started with Twilio and gave us a bunch of free credits. We are putting them to good use, using them to text homeless youth of available beds. Winning!

A shout out to SendGrid and their social network people. I showed them an early prototype of this app, told them I intended to use SendGrid for emailing homeless youth when beds became available. Their reaction? A big account with lots of free credits, plus a t-shirt for yours truly!

This was a great project. I hope to work on more like it.

RavenDB MVC starter kit

Looking to get started building ASP.NET MVC apps with RavenDB? Check out RavenDB.ModernMvcStarterKit. It’s an MVC template that lets users register on your site, verify their registration via email, and allows them to opt-in to two-factor authentication via email or SMS.

Modern websites need a robust identity system, where users can login, confirm their registration via email, and optionally enable two-factor authentication.

Doing this with the .NET + RavenDB stack has had some friction:

  • The default MVC template is wired to work with Entity Framework, not RavenDB.
  • Making the default template work with RavenDB is non-trivial, and requires implementing a RavenDB-specific identity provider.
  • There is no publicly-available Identity provider for RavenDB. Or rather, there are 2 available, but they work against old versions of Identity Framework: tugberkugurlu’s AspNet.Identity.RavenDB and ILM’s RavenDB.AspNet.Identity.
  • The basic MVC template from Visual Studio doesn’t implement email service or SMS service, nor UI for this or Two-Factor Authentication, leaving it up to you to do all the heavy lifting.

To remove this friction, I created RavenDB.ModernMvcStarterKit.

In a nutshell, it’s an MVC sample project that uses RavenDB as the backend, supports user registration and confirmation via email (SendGrid), and optionally supports Two-Factor Authentication via email (SendGrid) or SMS (Twilio).

This project provides:

  • A RavenDB-backed identity provider, updated to work with the latest MS Identity Framework (2.1 at the time of this writing). This is a fork of ILM’s RavenDB.AspNet.Identity provider, updated to work with email and SMS authentication and the latest Identity bits. I’ve submitted a pull request with my changes to merge back into that repo.
     
     
  • A registration confirmation system: when a user registers, he is required to confirm his registration via email. The email is sent via your developer SendGrid account. Upon registering, the user is presented with the following screen:
    The user will receive an email with a confirmation link. Following the link, he’ll be taken to this page:
     
     
  • Optional two-factor authentication: Users can optionally go to their profile page and add a phone number and enable Two-Factor Authentication:
    When the user enters his phone number, we send an SMS verification code via your developer Twilio account:
    With Two-Factor Authentication enabled, when the user goes to sign-in next time, he will first login as usual, and then be prompted to enter the 2nd form of identification, either email or SMS:
    The user will receive a verfication code via SMS or email and be redirected to the verification page:
    Upon entering the verification code, they’ll be able to sign in.

Bottom line: this is a nice way to build a modern MVC app with RavenDB. It’s all about removing friction. Smile Check out the project on GitHub.

Enjoy!

Video: Dev Life Made Better with RavenDB

My talk out at RavenDB Days in Malmo, Sweden. A fun, lighthearted talk on why Raven is an excellent choice for modern apps.

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(Slides here)

Had a blast giving this talk! Some great interactions with the audience, some great feedback afterwards. I think the audience enjoyed.

p.s. If you’re in Minnesota, Twin Cities Code Camp takes place this weekend, I’ll be giving a talk – also My Little Pony-infused Smile — at Code Camp, so stop by and check it out, I think you’ll be entertained and might learn a few things along the way.

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Lap Around HTML5 RAvenDB Studio

Last month, I was honored to give a talk at the very first (!) RavenDB conference, the first of many, as I believe Raven is poised for greatness as it gains more exposure and spreads its wings outside the .NET niche.

My talk was on the new Raven Studio – built from the ground-up using modern web technologies, HTML5, LESS, TypeScript – oh yes!

I hope you guys enjoy the new RavenDB Studio! It’s now available as unstable 3.0 build. Browse the code (or heck, send me pull requests) over at the GitHub repo.

RavenDB Studio 3.0, and why we moved from Silverlight to HTML5

Summary: A big step for RavenDB: a new HTML5 Studio. Plus, some thoughts on the move from Silverlight to HTML5 and our experience in the transition.

Yesterday, I pulled the covers off something I’ve been working on for a few months, something I’m very proud of.

RavenDB, the most popular NoSQL database in the .NET world, announced a brand new RavenDB Management Studio, Raven Studio 3.0, built from the ground up using HTML5 and modern web technologies. Yes, we’re moving away from Silverlight and onto HTML5.

Ayende and myself demoed the new Raven Studio just yesterday in a live webinar:

This has been my pet project for the last few months, and it’s something I’m quite proud of! I believe this is a huge step forward for RavenDB (more on that in a minute), and the reception from the Raven community has been awesome, ego-stoking, and totally energizing.

The old Raven Studio was built in Silverlight. Some Silverlight fans have asked, why did we move to HTML5? Are we making a big mistake moving away from Silverlight and to HTML5?

No, on the contrary, we believe HTML5 is a damn good option.

  • The RavenDB community wants an HTML5 Studio. This has probably been the most-requested item from the RavenDB community. It came up multiple times in the Raven 3.0 Wishlist, it’s come up whenever Oren talks about the Studio, it comes up when we speak to the external developer community, heck, when I was in Israel for RavenDB training last year, one of the students brought it up right there in the Hibernating Rhinos office. Silverlight has served us well over the years, but Silverlight is a dying technology that our community doesn’t want to be tied to any longer. 
     
  • Silverlight tooling is a perceived barrier to Raven adoption. I speak at Code Camps and user groups, and when I speak on RavenDB, the love flows and the excitement grows…until I show Silverlight tooling. I get the raised eyebrow. “Silverlight? Oh. I see.” Others in the Raven community have reported this as well. For some, Silverlight is a stumbling stone. 
     
  • HTML5 is a step towards cross-platform Raven. RavenDB is the best NoSQL database for .NET. But, in time, we want Raven to spread her wings and be not just the best NoSQL solution for .NET, but the best NoSQL database, period. Moving to an HTML5 toolset is a step towards this goal. 
     
  • The software industry is moving away from plugins. Plugins like Silverlight added abilities you couldn’t do on the native web, such as audio, video, gaming, 2d drawing, documents, voice, and more. Plugins filled these gaps, but with HTML5, these gaps are disappearing. We don’t need Adobe Acrobat plugins anymore to view that high fidelity document. We don’t need Java applets anymore to run that simulation. We don’t need websites built entirely with Flash. And we don’t need Silverlight for Raven Studio. There is little reason today to build something in JavaFX, Flash, or Silverlight: the native web has supplanted them. Just as it’s rare – and often undesired – to see a Java applet out in the wild, so too it will be with Silverlight in the coming years.
     
  • The native web platform is a solid foundation for the future. Microsoft products come and go. 3 years ago, Microsoft was pushing Silverlight as the platform for line of business apps and islands of richness on the web. Today, Silverlight is prevented from running in the default browser of their newest operating systems.

    HTML, on the other hand, has been a stable, ever-evolving technology for decades, and because it is the very fabric of the web, things built in HTML live indefinitely. There’s a reason you can still visit and use the 17-year old Space Jam Website. Smile But your MS Silverlight app from last year? It won’t run even on the latest MS operating system’s default browser.

As a Silverlight developer who has built professional apps (e.g. 3M Visual Attention Service) and spoken at Code Camps and user groups on Silverlight, truth be told, Silverlight is a great developer platform. C# is an excellent language, Visual Studio probably the best development environment.

But, in the words of Miguel de Icaza, creator of Moonlight (open source, cross-platform Silverlight),

“I felt that Silverlight had a bright future, and that it could turn to fill an important void, not only for web development, but for desktop development in general.  And this was largely one of my motivators. I am very sad that Microsoft strategy cut the air supply to Silverlight.”

This, coupled with the mobile computing explosion and the software industry’s shift away from plugins, results in a sickly future for Silverlight and Silverlight apps.

RavenDB rocks, and we want the tooling to rock as well. Having our tooling tied to this technology was not an attractive proposition, and it was time for us to move on.

A new technology stack for Raven Studio 3.0

After much deliberation and considering all the options available to us, we moved off of Silverlight.

Instead of Silverlight, HTML5.

Instead of C#, TypeScript.

TypeScript is awesome. TypeScript is new language, a superset of JavaScript designed for building apps on the web. Silverlight fans will be happy to know it’s built by none other than Anders Heijlsberg, the much-respected language designer and author of C#.

In TypeScript, all JavaScript is valid TypeScript code, so it’s familiar to any web developer, but it gives us nice things like an optional, flexible type system, classes, modules, and enums, and features proposed for future versions of JavaScript, but compiles to plain old JavaScript that runs in every browser.

TypeScript tooling is Visual Studio, with all the nice debugging and refactoring that brings, but it can also be written in any text editor and debugged in any browser.

For infrastructure, because we wanted the look & feel of a web application, rather than a set of web pages, we opted to build a single page application (SPA). Durandal.js gives us exactly that: a nice means to load pages on demand and compose them into a cohesive web application.

For UI, Durandal uses Bootstrap for a consistent, pleasing aesthetic, and KnockoutJS for data binding and MVVM.

Using data binding, MVVM, and Durandal makes a great developer experience, one not too foreign to the MVVM stuff in Silverlight. (Indeed, the author of Durandal.js is the same author of the popular Silverlight MVVM framework Caliburn Micro.) Look at the code and judge for yourself; you’ll see classes separated out into small, logical view models, and a clean separation between view and logic.

What has been our experience moving to HTML5?

One immediate, measurable gain was performance:

  • Memory usage dropped from 140MB to 20MB.
  • Cold starts dropped from ~7s to ~2s.
  • Warm starts dropped from ~3s to ~1s.
  • General snappiness: XAML is rather heavyweight, and you’ll notice just moving around the application, loading your documents, collections, or editing – it’s all faster in HTML5. Snappy and responsive.
  • This doesn’t happen:
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  • This doesn’t happen either:
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A lot of the above we get for free simply by Doing Less Stuff™. No .xap files to download, no dlls to load, no CLR runtime to start, no plugin host process for the browser, no browser-to-plugin communication, no managed code to start executing.

This translates into faster start times and less memory usage.

Another free item we get is JavaScript and the blazing-hot modern JS browser runtimes. The major browsers – IE, Firefox, Chrome, Safari – are in a cut-throat competition to get the fastest JavaScript runtime, to squeeze every possible ounce of performance out of JavaScript. You’ll regularly see these browser vendors advertising their JS benchmarks as proof of performance improvement. This is a free win for the new HTML5 Raven Studio: as browser vendors continue to improve their engines in this cut-throat, cross-company competition of speed, Raven Studio will reap the performance improvements.

Moving to the native web platform fixes some plugin-induced workflow hiccups. For example, keyboard shortcuts: Silverlight and other plugins eat the keyboard. So say you’re got Raven Studio opened, and you want to open a new browser tab, so you hit CTRL+T. Surprise, nothing happens. Why? Silverlight ate your keyboard shortcuts, your browser never received them, and your workflow was just interrupted.

If you’ve ever used one of those old all-Flash websites, or full-page Java applets, you’ve probably noticed some things just don’t feel right. So it was with the old Silverlight Studio. Moving to HTML5 fixes these issues.

Conclusion

Transitioning out of the plugin ghetto and moving to HTML5 has been a delight, but more importantly, it’s good for RavenDB users as we move to a faster, more lightweight tool. It’s good for the future of RavenDB to have our tooling built on the solid rock of the native web.

I understand the Silverlight fans who are sad to see the old Silverlight Studio go. I’m a Silverlight fan myself, I understand their concerns. The most I can ask of you guys is to give us the opportunity to earn your trust. It will take time, but with a faster, more lightweight, stable tool that does what you need and gets out of your way, I believe that trust will be earned.

The new HTML5 Raven Studio is on GitHub and we’d love for you to give it a spin or even contribute to the code. I’m pleased to say we already have had a few contributions since it was released just yesterday. I’m proud of this work, and I really hope you guys enjoy it!

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